A Case Assessment And A Traditional Assessment

In the light of legislation that makes it costly to fire workers it is important for firms to hire the right people right away. Such legislation also makes it difficult for employees, because there are fewer jobs on offer. In view of these realities case interview techniques have developed. The aim is to make selection processes more reliable and accurate.

The tendency is for this technique to be used at the higher echelons of employment, such as in large financial institutions where the cost of employing the best people may be considered worthwhile. Ironically, the procedures have much in common with the old fashioned methods of apprenticeship. In both instances the aim to penetrate to below the surface of a character and assess aptitude at the deepest possible level.

Although modern methods cannot replicate the intimate knowledge that a master blacksmith might have had of his apprentice, attempts are made to approach that sort of knowledge. The aim is to ascertain exactly how a candidate might react in a work situation that is likely to occur. This is done by setting role playing or problem solving activities which yield information on how a candidate is likely to respond to specific situations.

Although modern methods cannot replicate the intimate knowledge that a master blacksmith might have had of his apprentice, attempts are made to approach that sort of knowledge. The aim is to ascertain exactly how a candidate might react in a work situation that is likely to occur. This is done by setting role playing or problem solving activities which yield information on how a candidate is likely to respond to specific situations.

Traditionally, a panel of employees was chosen to conduct an interview. The candidates faced them across a table and answered questions, some hostile, some supportive, some banal. After each candidate’s performance in front of the panel, discussion might have dealt with his or her performance in the light of a resume, submitted previously. The scope for subjective and superficial judgments is apparent.

Mannerisms, facial expressions and body language would all play their part, and perhaps inordinate parts when the importance of such things as getting jobs done on a daily basis is considered. The personal prejudices of individuals would also have free rein, and this is not healthy even though it does take place commonly in ordinary work. In case interviews there is an attempt to avoid superficiality and penetrate in the candidates suitability for the position

The case interview technique aims for a greater degree of objectivity. The need for interviewers to engage personally with candidates is reduced, and they are able to withdraw to a more objective stance as they survey the evidence of how a person copes with the sort of challenge that will be faced in the actual job situation. SABUNG AYAM